Vein scanners for Japanese bank

03/10/12

The popularity of palm vein scanners in Japanese ATMs continues with news that a regional bank in Gifu Prefecture in Hashima, Japan, has begun using the technology to allow customers to withdraw cash, make deposits and check account balances.

The technology, supplied by Fujitsu, is being offered by Ogaki Kyoritsu Bank. Customers must input their birthday, put their palm on the scanner and input their PIN code.

The ATMs will initially be installed at 10 banks, as well as a drive-through ATM and two mobile banks.

In addition to improving customer convenience, the ATMs were developed in response to the large number of people who lost their cards and other forms of personal identification in the wake of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, local media reported.

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Veins recognition is ever popular in Japanese banks
Veins recognition is ever popular in Japanese banks

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