European football clubs eye biometrics goal
10 October 2014 16:19 GMT

There have also been protests over the technology, which is hoped to help authorities stamp out hooliganism.

More European football clubs could start using biometric identification systems following the introduction of palm vein scanners at Hungarian champions Ferencvaros’ ground in Budapest, according to a local biometrics firm.

Peter Gyorgydeak, managing director of the Hungarian firm that developed the scanners, Biosec Kft, told a news agency that other clubs could now follow suit, despite the anger of some fans at the technology.

In September there were protests over the technology, which is hoped to help authorities stamp out hooliganism. Fans have formed the group “Supporters without privacy”.

BioSec’s palm vein identification system is based on Fujitsu’s PalmSecure technology – though as software developer all API's were developed by BioSec. The firm says the solution is fast enough to let 22 000 people in within 60 minutes at 36 gates.

At ADO Den Haag's ground in the Hague, facial recognition at the entrance and in the stadium are linked to microphone detection of aggressive or otherwise undesirable speech. The latter system can allocate a person that starts a discriminating football chant and detect who is following.

Biometrics not only hold benefits for clubs wishing to avoid expensive penalties from UEFA over violence or racism, the technology also could eliminate the issue of ticket touts.

Gyorgydeak told Reuters that Biosec have had enquiries from Western Europe, Russia and the United States, and was in talks with possible buyers in the sports and financial sectors.

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